Schaff on Non-Establishment

schaffA Prussian immigrae, Phillip Schaff (1819-1893) was committed to the idea of uniting Lutheran and Reformed churches which began in Germany under the aegis of Prince Frederick William IV. Dr. Schaff is perhaps better known for his voluminous writings on Church history and the ancient fathers. His contribution alongside John W. Nevin in making “Mercersburg Theology”(1) is also significant as a traditional Protestant answer to American revivalism. Initially scandalized by the proliferation of enthusiastic sects, Schaff gradually found a silver-lining in American disestablishment, concluding God’s Providence set aside the United States to play a crucial role in forging an Evangelical Christendom by voluntaristic means. His change of opinion on freedom of religion is worth study, answering questions perhaps vexing for Anglicans-abroad who normally are ambivalent about their Republican advantages and not-too-distant past with Royal Supremacy.  Continue reading

Two Province Solution

dmaSince 1977 personality conflict has stereotyped division in the continuing movement (1). Ironically, complicating ecclesiastical fragmentation in the Continuum has been the keeping of rigid geographic dioceses. Thankfully, this prejudice is beginning to erode as extra mural Anglicans are consciously redefining dioceses in ‘relational’ rather than geographic terms– allowing congregations to align themselves to like-minded Bishops . Last August, the APA-DMA standing committee voted to postpone reunion with ACA. Some worry the APA-ACA merger process might be derailed. But, we ask, “why not let DMA remain a relatively independent diocese while the rest of the APA/ACA press forward, permitting a non-geographic option?” This may be a last ditch solution, but it could also preserve a broad church identity while the rest of APA rushes toward a formal ‘anglo-catholic’ identity.  

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ABBS Patronage

Robinson

His Rt. Rev. Lordship Peter Robinson

Congratulations! Recently, the Anglican Bible & Book Society (ABBS) received Bishop Peter Robinson as their episcopal Patron. Bishop Robinson has been a long-time favorite at this blog, and my wife and I traveled to Arizona to be confirmed by his Grace prior to our marriage in 2010. It’s our humble opinion that Mr. Robinson is perhaps the best learned Anglican bishop in North America. His writings have been an enormous help in locating the true boundaries of Anglican belief. His essays may be found at Old High Churchman.   Continue reading

Serving the Altar

tabernacle

Ark’s Procession

I’ve been reading Barbara Gent and Betty Sturges’ handbook for Altar Guilds, published in 1982. The handbook partly deals with the history of the Sacristan and how it’s changed since the Victorian era. Until now, I haven’t pondered the orthodoxy of women serving at the Altar. Instead, I assumed anything that involved folding or cleaning linen was ‘servile’ or ‘housekeeping’– thus, no problem for male headship. But male headship has its limits, and it does not answer why altar service was first targeted by early feminists. Until I read Gent’s guide, I had no idea how recent an innovative were Altar Guilds. One reason for the phenomena is likely the loss of the Altar (or even sanctuary) as a focal point for public worship.
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Home Oratories

whole duty

Necessary for Families

This post is partly a response to a few requests I’ve had about my attempt at making a Home Oratory with my family: Queen Anna’s Prochapel. Posts at Anglican Rose are coming to a trickle with Post-Brockton being one of the last. I’ll perhaps resume regular writing in 2015, but I’ve chosen to postpone further commentary until developments in pan-Anglicanism become more settled. Meanwhile, study resources will be added at this post (and elsewhere) that expand upon the idea of building “Little Giddings” in Anglican households.
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Post-Brockton

Lady of the Snows

Lady of the Snows

This post is the last of a four-part series on the future of the Continuing movement and it potential impact on North American Anglicanism. The earlier commentary can be read at “Continuing Politics” under AR’s Scriptorium

Otherwise known as the World Consultation, the Anglican futures conference held in Brockton, MA in 2011 may have been the most important event to hit the Continuing Anglican movement since the 1998 REC-APA unity talks. While the precise consequence of the Brockton conference is elusive, two possible outcomes that impact North American Anglicanism seem immanent. ”Post-Brockton” not only can unite the majority of the continuum, but it also risks cutting ties with ACNA (more specifically the REC-FiFNA coalition inside ACNA). Some of these contours have already been examined in the earlier yet equally lengthy article: the Bartonville Factor.
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Sabbath Days

Christ is Risen

Sabbaths and Holy Days are interchangeable concepts. Puritans understood the Christian Sabbath largely as a continuation of the OT Mosaic code translated to Sunday observance.  Anglicans took a more nuanced view, retaining the general idea of “rest” but putting aside the ceremonial strictness of the OT. Such a treatment of Sabbath-keeping gave Anglicans leeway to establish other holy days aside from fixed Sundays, revealing a pastoral sensitivity toward Sabbath-keeping as well keeping the proper division of ecclesiastical vs. divine law. Continue reading